From wholesale halloween costumes private jets and fast food to deregulation, Trump will usher in new era

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From wholesale halloween costumes private jets and fast food to deregulation, Trump will usher in new era

WHCostumes
Every U.S. presidential administration wholesale halloween costumes is a pacesetter, and the same will be true for the incoming Trump administration.

Here are business-related trends, large Halloween Costumes Outlet and small, that could end up being considered either "in" or "out" during Donald Trump's regime, which begins with his Jan. 20 presidential inauguration.

Private qwqfdvdsadf jets. Remember the public outcry in 2008 when U.S. auto executives flew in their private planes to ask Washington power brokers for an industry bailout? Throughout the years of the Obama administration, private jets were branded as examples of corporate excess and business jet sales have been lackluster for years. Now, the makers of private aircraft see an ally in Trump, who flies around in his own namesake plane and even prefers it over Air Force One. Industry analysts expect the new president will destigmatize private plane use and that will translate into more business jet orders. Shares of small aircraft makers have gained altitude since Trump's election.

Eric ZornI once picked on Democratic Vice President Al Gore in a column because he claps like a child, so be assured there's nothing partisan in my attack today on Republican President-elect Donald Trump for wearing his neckties like a little boy.

When we're young and small and compelled by social circumstance...

I once picked on Democratic Vice President Al Gore in a column because he claps like a child, so be assured there's nothing partisan in my attack today on Republican President-elect Donald Trump for wearing his neckties like a little boy.

Golf. Presidents liking golf is nothing new. Eisenhower, Kennedy, the Bushes, Clinton and Obama all hit the links during their terms. Trump, however, loves the game of golf, which reportedly has an annual U.S. economic impact of nearly $70 billion. His privately held company owns or operates 17 golf courses, some of which host major tournaments. Still, golf has been in the rough for years as the number of younger, recreational players has dipped. But one legendary player, Jack Nicklaus, told Yahoo Finance that Trump will reinvigorate the game and, when it comes to golf, who disagrees with The Golden Bear?

Fast food. First lady Michelle Obama strongly advocated on behalf of children and families eating freshly made, healthy and organic foods. President Obama provided wing support. But President-elect Trump? Not so much. Throughout the campaign, he gobbled fast food fare. During a CNN Republican presidential town hall, Trump noted he was an aficionado of Burger King and KFC, but added that what he really enjoys is locally based McDonald's Big Macs, Quarter Pounders with cheese and even the fish. Will the presidential seal be good for the Golden Arches? It could be.

Social media. Trump and Twitter. The two have become synonymous in today's real-time information age. Trump shows no signs of easing back on his personal tweets, especially those aimed at U.S. corporations doing something that peeves him. Trump has already lobbed critical tweets at Boeing, Lockheed Martin, General Motors and Toyota. At the very least, CEOs who probably never tweeted in their lives are now aware of the power of social media. They're especially learning how it can turn public opinion, and rattle a company stock price, with just one early morning tweet from the nation's next chief executive.

Moonlighting. Although Trump is rich, he is one of millions of Americans supplementing their incomes with second jobs. But instead of renting short-term residential space via Airbnb or driving part time for ride-sharing firms Uber and Lyft, Trump's side gig is being an executive producer of NBC's "The New Celebrity Apprentice." The TV show is an offshoot of the "The Apprentice," which then private citizen Trump hosted and helped to start years ago. In what seems to be a first for a sitting president, Trump's name will appear on the new show's credits.

Elise ViebeckPresident-elect Donald Trump shrugged off rising concerns Tuesday about the potential conflicts-of-interest between his ongoing participation in the Trump Organization and his future as president, saying the president "can't have a conflict of interest" and that the law is "totally" on his side.

...President-elect Donald Trump shrugged off rising concerns Tuesday about the potential conflicts-of-interest between his ongoing participation in the Trump Organization and his future as president, saying the president "can't have a conflict of interest" and that the law is "totally" on his side.

...Conflicts of interest. Typically, when new presidents take office, they put their financial assets into a blind trust and hire somebody to manage them throughout their term. President-elect Trump, a lifelong business executive with a vast array of holdings, is not buying into that traditional approach. He'll soon hold a news conference about how he intends to deal with this issue. What Trump does, or doesn't do, regarding potential conflicts will resonate as an example throughout government and commerce.

Business regulations. If President Obama was chided by business leaders for being the great regulator, President-elect Trump is being hailed as the great un-regulator. Trump's vowing to roll back financial, environmental, workplace and other regulations. Ditching many business regulations could boost short-term economic growth but potentially open the door to corporate excess and trouble for taxpayers, as in 2008 when Wall Street and the financial industry had to be bailed out.

Overseas trade. "Made in the USA" will be a Trump administration mantra. On the outs will be trade pacts, corporate international expansion and addressing of global issues such as climate control. Trump's core constituency of middle-America workers, who saw manufacturing jobs shipped overseas, will back this strategy. However, the bicoastal tech industry, which depends on China to manufacture its many wares, is worried about what's next.

Oh, and there's one more trend: men's business dress.

President Obama prefers dark suits, crisp white shirts and neatly knotted solid-colored ties.

President-elect Trump dresses in a similar manner with two sartorial differences.

While in a suit, Trump will occasionally sport a red baseball cap with a slogan stitched on it. He also prefers long solid-color ties that go a couple of inches past his belt buckle and look sort of like an airport runway.